Environmental Goods Agreement Wiki

Green growth is an essential element of the EU`s economic and environmental policy. Open trade in environmental goods and services can contribute to the development of green growth. The EU is working to liberalise trade in environmental goods and services multilaterally within the World Trade Organisation and its free trade agreements. It also endeavours to ensure that existing rules are applied. On 24 January 2014, the EU and 13 other WTO members committed to start negotiations on the liberalisation of world trade in goods (see the Davos Declaration and the EU press release). Esa negotiations were officially started in Geneva on 8 July 2014 (see the joint statement of all countries participating in the green products negotiations, the EU press release and the press conference). The start of the negotiations was accompanied by an event organized by the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development. The European Commission negotiates on behalf of the EU. It builds on the instructions given by EU Member States to the Council in 2001 to negotiate the WTO negotiations on the Doha Development Agenda. On 8 May 2014, the Council gave further instructions to the Commission for the negotiation of the ITA. The European Commission has launched a Sustainable Development Impact Assessment (SIA) of the Environmental Goods Convention to assess the economic, social and environmental impacts. Environmental goods and services in the EU The EU has technologically advanced and first-class companies that provide environmental goods and services. Between 2002 and 2011, employment in the green sector increased from 3 to 4.2 million full-time equivalents in the EU.

Even during the recession years (2007-2011), employment increased by 20%. Products that contribute directly to environmental and climate protection: trade in environmental goods will benefit from increasing regulatory convergence, provided that the negotiations attract a large number of participants. This requires two changes: an expanded list of environmental products and a „greening of GATT,“ under which countries must take measures that protect the environment to promote the participation of developing countries (Mavroidis and Melo 2015). . . .